Peter Doig at Tate Britain

My article on Peter Doig’s exhibition at Tate Britain has been published by Bohemian Aesthetic. See below:

Peter Doig: in the footsteps of Gauguin?

It’s not often I’d walk away from an artist’s work; and if I do, I try to return to it or I find ways for it not to affect me. In fact, Doig’s work is difficult for me to ignore, and I’ve been at a loss to explain this to myself. I can only do so by trying to recall the wise words of one of my lecturers at film school, the legendary Laura Mulvey, who makes the point to always look for something good in a work of art. In relation to Doig’s work, I’m still looking. Maybe one day I’ll understand it.
 
Walking in the footsteps of Gauguin (if, indeed, that’s what Doig is doing), his Trinidad series doesn’t share the same terrain—that of intimacy and compassion. Instead, the paintings appear to be distant and cold, murky, entering the filmic realms. But that’s not Doig’s intention; he says, “people often say that my paintings remind them of particular scenes from films or from certain passages from books, but I think it’s a different thing altogether. There is something more primal about painting.”  But the fact remains that Doig’s work does resemble still frames from motion pictures. His “Rasta in the Thicket in Trinidad” could easily be a shot out of Predator.

Click here to read this article in full.

Published by the kind permission of Bohemian Aesthetic eZine

 

 

Anish Kapoor at The Bohemian Aesthetic

“The work of internationally acclaimed sculptor Anish Kapoor, derived from diverse forms and materials, leaves viewers spellbound. It also clearly rests within the notions of infinity. His shapes, colours, and subject matter expressly indicate that he has a tremendous understanding of mathematics as Art. (I confess this is a somewhat personal view and not something universally shared by Kapoor followers.)”.

My article on Anish Kapoor can be read in full last month’s eZine; The Bohemian Aesthetic. This is my third article for the section ‘London Letters.’ The Bohemian Aesthetic is published each month on the 15th

“In the introduction of the 1996 publication of his collection, writer/curator Germano Celant encapsulated the profound force behind Kapoor’s work:

“The ordeal of the void, of limbo, is a necessary precondition to gaining mastery over nothingness and the self. It occurs through a dramatic experience of the breath, the unknown fearsome word that rises up from the earth…capturing the force of life, as vortex, as eruption, is the essence of art; and art, in turn, through the principle of opposites, triggers the reading of life. This is the alchemy of creation.”

To read the full my article

Created by Pasty Moore, The Bohemian Aesthetic is a remarkable eZine focusing on diverse subject matters in line with exploring works by artists unafraid to act against the status quo.

Patsy Moore is a critically-acclaimed singer/songwriter, poet and essayist, film and television score composer, and humanities lecturer, who lives in Los Angeles, California.

The Bohemian Aesthetic eZine was launched based on an arts newsletter that Patsy published between 1994 and 1995. Along with publishing and editing this project, Patsy shoulders the primary responsibility of producing The World Watch Papers and The Bohemian Aesthetics video supplement, BohoTV.

Extract reproduced by the kind permission of The Bohemian Aesthetic©2007

Stuart Hall at The Bohemian Aesthetic

“Writing about Stuart Hall, who turned 75 earlier this year, highlights a key point of his importance to the fabric of the cultural and socio-political make-up of today’s Britain. One of the important thinkers of our time, Hall possesses a tremendous intellectual, analytical process, with creative applications to race, class, and culture. He’s also one of my all-time heroes”. My article on Stuart Hall can been read in full here in this month’s eZine; The Bohemian Aesthetic. This is my second article for the section ‘London Letters’. The Bohemian Aesthetic is published each month on the 15th.

“Stuart Hall, now Professor of Sociology at the Open University, was a major figure in the revival of the British political Left in the 1960s and ’70s. Following Althusser, he argues that the media appear to reflect reality whilst in fact they construct it.”

Daniel Chandler

Read the full article

Created by Pasty Moore, The Bohemian Aesthetic is a remarkable eZine focusing on diverse subject matters in line with exploring works by artists unafraid to act against the status quo.

Patsy Moore is a critically-acclaimed singer/songwriter, poet and essayist, film and television score composer, and humanities lecturer, who lives in Los Angeles, California.

The Bohemian Aesthetic eZine was launched based on an arts newsletter that Patsy published between 1994 and 1995. Along with publishing and editing this project, Patsy shoulders the primary responsibility of producing The World Watch Papers and The Bohemian Aesthetics video supplement, BohoTV.

Extract reproduced by the kind permission of The Bohemian Aesthetic©2007

The Bohemian Aesthetic

My article on Zarina Bhimji and her nomination for the Turner Prize has been published in this month’s eZine; The Bohemian Aesthetic. I will be writing for them in the section ‘London Letters’ on a regular basis. The Bohemian Aesthetic is published each month on the 15th. 

“With an extraordinary body of work and a humble, dedicated approach to her art, Zarina Bhimji encapsulates the Indian notion of tapasya, wherein a person is devoted, without distraction or pomposity, to explore, understand, and present to the world, truly open to its judgment”  To read more of my article click here.

Created by Pasty Moore, The Bohemian Aesthetic is a remarkable eZine focusing on diverse subject matters in line with exploring works by artists unafraid to act against the status quo.

Patsy Moore is a critically-acclaimed singer/songwriter, poet and essayist, film and television score composer, and humanities lecturer, who lives in Los Angeles, California.
 
The Bohemian Aesthetic eZine was launched based on an arts newsletter that Patsy published between 1994 and 1995. Along with publishing and editing this project, Patsy shoulders the primary responsibility of producing The World Watch Papers and The Bohemian Aesthetics video supplement, BohoTV. 

Extract reproduced by the kind permission of The Bohemian Aesthetic©2007